🎥Video Inside! Audition Do's and Don'ts: Cry-Talking💀

Bringing authenticity is HUGE in drama school auditions. And cry-talking is the ultimate BARRIER to seeing YOU.



Needles to say, this will not be a long post because it's not hard to understand, yet it's important to mention.


If you want to get accepted into your top drama schools, do not fall victim to "cry-talking."


What is cry-talking?


You know what cry-talking is.


Cry-talking is when you talk but you kind of sound like your crying at the same time.


It's indicating emotion, and we've all seen it (and probably even done it) as actors, but it has no place in your acting as you mature and it will DEFINITELY hurt your chances of getting accepted into drama school.


The video below will help illustrate cry-talking so you can eliminate it and replace it with something authentic and interesting.


If you're cry-talking, it doesn't necessarily mean you're a bad actor. It means you're telling the story in the least interesting way - you're indicating emotion and not actually feeling something - and that's no good for anybody.


Good actors are always striving to make the most interesting choices, so it's just a matter of using your imagination and finding something more authentic and interesting.

Never INDICATE crying in your college audition monologues. 

Feeling something and finding your own emotional truth is always way more interesting than performing your idea of crying.


Review Emotion Memory and Sense Memory exercises from Stanislavski to help open up your emotional instrument more.


Here's a good article to review about emotional authenticity.


Cheers!

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